Henri Matisse

Henri Matisse
Jeannette IV, 1911
Jardin à Issy (L’atelier à Clamart), um 1917
Jeune femme assise en robe de résille, 1939
Océanie, la mer, 1946/47
Océanie, le ciel, 1946/47
Algue blanche sur fond rouge et vert, 1947
Intérieur à la fougère noire, 1948
Nu bleu I, 1952
Nu bleu, la grenouille, 1952
Acanthes, 1953
Jeannette IV, 1911
Add to favorites 

Currently not on show

Henri Matisse
Jeannette IV, 1911

Bronze, cast 1/10, F. Costenoble, Fondeur Paris, 61 x 23 x 28 cm
Photo: Robert Bayer, Basel

Matisse displayed the evolution of his art again and again in series of pictures and sculptures, whereby his primary concern was to document a continual movement away from the natural model towards abstraction. The present bust is one of a series of five portraits of the model Jeanne Vaderin, made between 1910 and 1913. While the first two portrait heads still closely reflect her real-life appearance, the three thereafter grow increasingly abstract. Jeannette IV gives the impression of being composed of three-dimensional blocks: base, upper chest, neck, head and hair. Matisse is here reacting to Cubism’s dissection and new construction of pictorial matter.

Jardin à Issy (L’atelier à Clamart), um 1917
Add to favorites 

Currently not on show

Henri Matisse
Jardin à Issy (L’atelier à Clamart), um 1917

The Garden at Issy (The Studio in Clamart)
Oil on canvas, 130.5 x 89.5 cm
Photo: Robert Bayer, Basel

The painting offers a view of Matisse’s garden at Issy-les-Moulineaux, where the artist had bought a house for himself and his family in 1909. In 1917, the year he produced this picture, Matisse was becoming ever more abstract, ever more radical in his pictorial compositions – an artistic phase during which the oppressive reality of the First World War may have played a role. Only a few recognizable details are shown – the house, the suggestion of trees and a fountain in the foreground. The garden is essentially represented as a system of interlocking planes, which are bounded by segments of circles. These forms cast shadows on the brownish red ground, lending the painting a strange sense of depth.

Jeune femme assise en robe de résille, 1939
Add to favorites 

Currently exhibited at the Palazzo dei Diamanti in Ferrara

Henri Matisse
Jeune femme assise en robe de résille, 1939

Seated Young Woman in Net Dress
Charcoal on paper, 66.2 x 51 cm
Photo: Cantz Medienmanagement, Ostfildern

In 1935 Lydia Delectorskaya became Matisse’s most important model and his muse. Ever in search of absolute harmony in a consummate décoration, the painter was powerfully struck by her long-limbed body and the shape of her face. Lydia was not only the inspiration behind a number of his major paintings but also influenced his style of draughtsmanship. In the drawings that he made of her, Matisse further developed his astounding ability to infuse every line with expression and to convey the three-dimensional body in just a few strokes. A particular feature of this work is the way in which Matisse has combined the use of charcoal with a smudging technique to invest his drawing with painterly expression.

Océanie, la mer, 1946/47
Add to favorites 

Currently not on show

Henri Matisse
Océanie, la mer, 1946/47

Oceania, the Sea
Screenprint on linen, 4/30, 173.5 x 387.5 cm
Photo: Peter Schibli, Basel

Océanie, le ciel, 1946/47
Add to favorites 

Currently not on show

Henri Matisse
Océanie, le ciel, 1946/47

Oceania, the Sky
Screenprint on linen, 4/30,173 x 364 cm
Photo: Peter Schibli, Basel

Algue blanche sur fond rouge et vert, 1947
Add to favorites 

Currently not on show

Henri Matisse
Algue blanche sur fond rouge et vert, 1947

White Algae on Red and Green Background
Paper cutouts painted in gouache glued on paper, 52.5 x 40.5 cm
Photo: Robert Bayer, Basel

Intérieur à la fougère noire, 1948
Add to favorites 

Currently not on show

Henri Matisse
Intérieur à la fougère noire, 1948

Interior with Black Fern
Oil on canvas, 116.5 x 89.5 cm
Photo: Peter Schibli, Basel

Interior with black fern is one of the last pictures that Matisse painted prior to turning his attention almost exclusively to papiers découpés. Here he has arrived at a harmony of figure, objects, interior and exterior space. Various zones of colour are juxtaposed: the red wallpaper with its regular geometric pattern, the yellow carpet dotted with black, the green disc of the table bearing a vase that is also patterned with dots, and the black providing the ground for the artist’s signature. The woman on the left has no individuality; the white of her dress and the pink of her skin play a crucial role in the picture’s composition. The link between the exterior glimpsed above right, where we can make out a tree, and the interior is provided by the fern, which is seen against the light and consequently appears black. This work underlines a distinctive characteristic of Matisse’s painting: his pictures possess a rhythm that arises not just out of the movement of his painting hand but also from the relationship between the parts of the picture, which seems to obey laws similar to a musical structure.

Nu bleu I, 1952
Add to favorites 

Currently not on show

Henri Matisse
Nu bleu I, 1952

Blue Nude I
Paper cutouts painted in gouache glued on paper on canvas, 106 x 78 cm
Photo: Robert Bayer, Basel

Nu bleu, la grenouille, 1952
Add to favorites 

Currently not on show

Henri Matisse
Nu bleu, la grenouille, 1952

Blue Nude, the Frog
Paper cutouts painted in gouache glued on paper on canvas, 141 x 134 cm
Photo: Robert Bayer, Basel

Acanthes, 1953
Add to favorites 

Currently not on show

Henri Matisse
Acanthes, 1953

Acanthuses
Charcoal and paper cutouts painted in gouache glued on paper on canvas, 311 x 350.5 cm
Photo: Robert Bayer, Basel

Henri Matisse
Henri Matisse

1869, Le Cateau-Cambrésis (France) – 1954, Nice

The French painter, sculptor and printmaker studied art in Paris at the Académie Julian and the École des Beaux-Arts. Around 1900 he produced his first sculptures; at the same time, under the influence of Monet, Cézanne and Gauguin, he began painting in pure, luminous colour. As a leading figure of the Fauvist circle, Matisse caused a sensation with the works he showed at the Autumn Salon in Paris. In 1906, after returning from a journey to Algeria, he produced his first woodcuts and lithographs. From early on he sought to transform three-dimensional, corporeal phenomena into flat, decorative designs. Initially, his interiors and still lifes combined three-dimensional, realistic forms and figures with ornamental arabesques. After the incisive experience of seeing an exhibition of Islamic art in Munich in 1910, followed by a trip to Morocco in 1912, he began painting solely flat areas of colour. He aspired to a form of spiritual art which was infused with peace and harmony, and which everyone would be able to partake in. In the late 1920s he turned increasingly to mural and architectural painting. In 1948 he embarked on his first paper collages, called “gouaches découpées”; over four years, from 1947 to 1951, he painted murals and designed decorations for the interior of the Chapelle du Rosaire in the southern French town of Vence.

Station